Congratulations! After all the keyword research, persona building and targeting analysis, you’ve just launched your first AdWords campaign on the Google Search Network. Now you hover, hand on the mouse, AdWords Editor open, waiting to make adjustments at the first sign of any discernible traffic…

STOP! (In the name of love?)

Like a new breakthrough single, you need to give the ads a chance to find their footing in the market, before they can soar on the airwaves of the SERP…which is a really poetic way of my virtually smacking your nose with a newspaper and telling you to leave them alone.

This is really one of the biggest mistakes we find with new advertisers – the insistence to begin changing ads before there is any real data to base decisions on. It’s hard to be patient, but you really need to let the Google algorithm do its work so that your PPC Specialist can make the right decisions about your account.

New Ad Campaigns Are Like A Band You’ve Never Heard Of.

Because AdWords is a revenue source for Google, they’re going to be naturally cautious about putting something brand new against their solid performers right away, no matter how much they spend. The Rolling Stones have been around forever and are solid sellers, so they’re likely to get prime placement on an mp3 site over John’s Brand New Rock Band. Until there’s some history that tells them how much money you’re likely to make them, Google isn’t going to let you outbid Mick Jagger. You might buy your way to the top of the charts, but if no one clicks on your ads, Google loses money.

When Do People Want To Hit Play?

Google’s algorithm will be able to figure out the best times to show your ads over time, but you need to give them a large enough sample size to do that. If you start your ads on Monday but change direction on Friday, you’ll have no idea if your optimum audience is clicking on the weekends. We recommend a minimum of seven days, but be aware that a major news event or holiday will skew the data. A full week will build statistical significance, and will help your PPC Specialist determine how to get the most bang for your buck throughout the week.

Is Your Quality Score a One-Hit Wonder?

Google also needs to determine the relevancy of your website in relation to the ads. Are people finding what they need when they go to your site? Is there a high bounce rate? Are visitors looking at multiple pages? This is called your Quality Score, and essentially Google is trying to figure out if there are more hits on the album, or if you’re destined to be another Macarena.

How Much Are You Willing To Pay For The Tour?

Quality Score also directly impacts your cost-per-click. The better your quality score, the less you’ll pay. If you have a better ROI, the more likely you are to stay with Google and continue to spend money with them. So it’s in your best interests to let the Quality Score establish itself so landing pages can be optimized, bad keywords can be eliminated, negative keywords can be identified, and you don’t lose your shirt on the tour.

Where Do People Want To See Your Band Play?

Is your audience on desktop or mobile? Are they most interested in that new song in Peoria or Pittsburgh? This information could open up new ideas for sales strategies and device targeting, and allow for increased visibility in key areas. It can also allow you to use the right language for the right part of the country – is it free “pop” or free “soda” with each CD sold? It depends if you’re in Maine or Montana!

Only time can allow the Google algorithm to do its job. If you change things drastically and too early, you’re essentially starting over because you affect the baseline data that Google needs to make recommendations that will make your account a best-seller. More data also allows a PPC Specialist to see differences and make predictions that positively affect your account. Here at Command Partners, our status as a Google Partner means that we understand the algorithm and how to make it work for our clients, taking you to number one with a bullet.

Contact us today to learn more.